Traffic controllers and the use of cell phones

The use of cell phones in road work and paving is something that comes with the territory. Cell phones are a valuable asset for workers who are separated by great distances, but dangers are present because of the cognitive impairment they can cause. Many paving crews and traffic control people have to stand and wait for things to happen, so the allure of checking a text or calling a friend during work is ever present. Workers in trucks are also tempted by cell phones as they wait for the go ahead from foremen.

Emergency roadwork being completed on Bridgeport Road and Gardencity Road at 11 p.m.

Emergency roadwork being completed on Bridgeport Road and Gardencity Road at 11 p.m. (Photo by Lukasz Jonca)

So many things happen so quickly during roadwork that any lapse in judgement can cause a fatality or serious injury.

Concentration and communication between co-workers is the key to staying safe for traffic control people. (Photo by Lukasz Jonca)

Concentration and communication between co-workers is the key to staying safe for traffic control people. (Photo by Lukasz Jonca)

The dangers can also be compounded by different variables such as working during the night or with poor weather conditions.

 

Cement trucks can be a huge hazard for workers that aren't paying attention on the work site. (Photo by Lukasz Jonca)

Cement trucks can be a huge hazard for workers that aren’t paying attention on the work site. (Photo by Lukasz Jonca)

 

Below is a short video that discusses the dangers of traffic controllers and the use of cell phones.

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The shift to robotics and cyber warfare

Technology used in warfare has been evolving and changing since the beginning of time. From swords and spears to bow and arrows and rifles. It has been just over 100 years since the start of World War I. Since that time technological advancements have changed the way that generals deploy their armies and conduct strategies. According to Andre Gerolymatas, professor of history at SFU, robotics and cyber warfare will be the wave of the future along with guerilla warfare. He says that it will no longer be state vs. state warfare like we’ve seen in the past and that most conflicts will be covert operations. There will also be less citizen participation in armies and more focus on specialized highly trained units that will combat the guerillas.

Video by Lukasz Jonca

The unwelcomed new neighbour: medical marihuana production in the ALR

Farmer Ian Paton has been around cows his entire life. What he knows is the grass they like is not the same grass that some businesses would prefer to grow.

Things are shaking up big time for the Agricultural Land Reserve as the B.C. Ministry of Agriculture has determined the production of Marihuana to be a farm use, which local government may regulate, but may not prohibit. It is considered to be on par with other forms of farming.

When you compare the price of a 4.5 kg bag of russet potatoes going for about $4.99 at most local grocers to the same weight of dried Marihuana the prices alter just a little bit. Here are some street level prices for Marihuana.

Half a kilogram of the soothing herb can cost anywhere from $1,200 to $2,400 depending on the quality. It sure beats growing potatoes. Especially when that same 4.5 kg goes from $4.99 per bag to roughly anywhere from $10,000 to $20,000. It would be in the best interest for any farmer to start growing these magic beans instead of food. Continue reading

Ladner’s Remembrance Day parade and ceremony

On Nov. 11, 2014 I took part in observing the Remembrance Day parade and ceremony in Ladner. There was an estimated crowd of 6000-7000.

The parade started at the Royal Canadian Legion branch 61 and ended at the cenotaph at Ladner Memorial Park.

I enjoyed meeting veterans and talking to locals about Remembrance Day and what it means to them. The video I made discusses the evolution in warfare in the last 100 years.

In this video journalist Lukasz Jonca goes out on assignment to film the Remembrance Day parade in Ladner, B.C.. Video by Lukasz Jonca

“Kuchenmuller” in German I think it means built to last

Manfred Kuchenmuller rows at the Delta Deas Slough early in the morning in fall. (Photo by Lukasz Jonca)

Manfred Kuchenmuller rows at the Delta Deas Slough early in the morning. (Photo by Lukasz Jonca)

The folks at the Delta Deas Rowing Club come in various shapes, sizes and ages, what’s surprising is there are quite a few members who are in their 60’s and over, just be sure not to call them seniors.

Out by the Delta Deas Slough on a cool fall morning is how some of these competitors start of their days. Tuesday morning at 9:30 a.m. the group of adults are ready to hit the water.

73-year-old Manfred Kuchenmuller is a site to behold as he powers along the dock with a singles rowboat over his shoulder. The whitish-gray moustache sits above a row of glistening pearly white chompers. Continue reading

Delta council will reimburse the Royal Canadian Legion for upgrades to cenotaph

Members of the Royal Canadian Legion branch #61 in Delta, B.C., will be reimbursed a grand total of $996.80 for upgrades to the cenotaph at Ladner Memorial Park just in time for Remembrance Day.

Al Ridgway, the president of the Royal Canadian Legion in Delta sent a letter to council regarding the upgrades to the cenotaph. The Delta Council decided to reimburse the Legion for the full amount they were asking for. The council came to the decision during the regular Monday meeting on Nov. 3, 2014. Continue reading

Adventures through Delta’s marshes

 

Makes me want to go swimming.

Makes me want to go swimming.

I have heard that the South Arm Marshes Wildlife Management Area (SAMWMA) is a great place to see birds and other wildlife. The tragedy of this little adventure is that I missed taking a photo of this grandiose Great Blue Heron swooping over my head. The lesson I learned is to be locked and loaded with my camera at all times. Other than that I had a lot of fun walking the paths and enjoying the fresh air. Lucky for me, some of the ancient looking worm ridden mushrooms I ran into, were too slow to get away from me. Continue reading

Small-plot farmers struggle with high water prices

Lower Mainland’s small-plot farmers are crippled by high water bills because they don’t have access to irrigation systems and are forced to use expensive city water.

Farmers on large plots of  land enjoy the use of city built irrigation systems and ditch water. The problem for small farmers is that they must use metred city water that has a tremendous cost attached with it.

Councillor Ian Paton raised his concerns at the Metro Vancouver Planning and Agricultural meeting On Oct. 3, 2014. Continue reading